horroroftruant:

Grindhouse Horror Movie Posters (9 Images)

Grindhouse is an American term for a theater that mainly showed exploitation films. It is thought to stem from the defunct burlesque theaters on 42nd Street, New York, where “bump n’ grind” dancing and striptease used to be on the bill. In the 1960s these theaters were put to new use as venues for exploitation films, a trend which continued strongly throughout the 1970s in New York City and other urban centers, mainly in North America, but began a long decline during the 1980s with the advent of home video.

Exploitation film is an informal label which may be applied to any film which is generally considered to be low budget, and therefore apparently attempting to gain financial success by “exploiting” a current trend or a niche genre or a base desire for lurid subject matter. The term “exploitation” is common in film marketing for promotion or advertising in any type of film. These films then need something to exploit, such as a big star, special effects, sex, violence, or romance. An “exploitation film”, however, due to its low budget, relies more heavily than usual on “exploitation”. Very often, exploitation films are widely considered to be of low quality, and are generally “B movies”. Even so, they sometimes attract critical attention and cult followings. Some films which might readily be labeled as “exploitation films” have become trend setters and of historical importance in their own right, such as Night of the Living Dead (1968). Some films also might be advertised by the producers themselves as “exploitation films” in order to pique the interest of those who seek out films of this type.

(via fallnmypetzombie)

Werner Herzog explains the plot of his new movie Good Will Hunting 2: Port of Call Los Angeles

(Source: oh-whiskers, via paulftompkins)

Do you like giant monsters? Of course you do!
That means you will definitely want to join us  in the screening room today for Godzilla Mania, presented by The Dreaming Comics and Books and Scarecrow Video. 
Today we’re showing three modern classics
4:00 Godzilla Vs. King Ghidora
6:00 Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidora (G.M.K)
8:00 Godzilla: Final Wars 
Concessions available at the counter - and VHSpresso.

Do you like giant monsters? Of course you do!

That means you will definitely want to join us  in the screening room today for Godzilla Mania, presented by The Dreaming Comics and Books and Scarecrow Video.

Today we’re showing three modern classics

4:00 Godzilla Vs. King Ghidora

6:00 Godzilla, Mothra, King Ghidora (G.M.K)

8:00 Godzilla: Final Wars

Concessions available at the counter - and VHSpresso.

(Source: delivermetoevil)

thecarnivalofhorror:

Behind the scenes of classic movie monsters.

(Source: kingpinhead, via gothiccharmschool)

warnerarchive:

wearentexpendable:

“A polite question is what the f*** kind of police force is this?”

The Super Cops (1974)

warnerarchive:

wearentexpendable:

A polite question is what the f*** kind of police force is this?”

The Super Cops (1974)

warnerarchive:

Original poster for The Hypnotic Eye (1960)

warnerarchive:

Original poster for The Hypnotic Eye (1960)

(Source: cinefamily)

Thelma Schoonmaker can be called nothing less than one of American film’s treasures. The award-winning editor has collaborated with Martin Scorsese on all 18 of his films. She has been nominated for seven Oscars in the Film Editing category, and has won three of them for Raging Bull, The Aviator, and The Departed. She has received seven BAFTA award nominations in Film Editing including for their most recent collaboration, The Wolf of Wall Street, and has won for two of them, Raging Bull and Goodfellas. She has also joined Martin Scorsese in her active commitment to film preservation, specifically focusing on the restoration and preservation of the films of her late husband, legendary director Michael Powell. In addition to her appearance at Scarecrow, Ms. Schoonmaker will also be at Seattle Art Museum to present two of these films:

Thursday, March 20 –A Matter of Life and Death (1946)  35mm, 104 min.
Friday March 21—Gone to Earth (1950)  35mm, 110 min.

 Tickets can also be purchased online here.

Both films start at 7:30pm at the Plestcheeff Auditorium in SAM Downtown. Ms. Schoonmaker will introduce the movies and answer audience questions each night.

 Tickets for both films are available at the SAM Box Office and at Scarecrow Video:

 $14—members of Seattle Art Museum, SIFF, Northwest Film Forum & TheFilmSchool.

$18—nonmembers 

 If there are seats remaining, single admission tickets will be sold at the door on the day of show. 

 

Thelma Schoonmaker can be called nothing less than one of American film’s treasures. The award-winning editor has collaborated with Martin Scorsese on all 18 of his films. She has been nominated for seven Oscars in the Film Editing category, and has won three of them for Raging Bull, The Aviator, and The Departed. She has received seven BAFTA award nominations in Film Editing including for their most recent collaboration, The Wolf of Wall Street, and has won for two of them, Raging Bull and Goodfellas. She has also joined Martin Scorsese in her active commitment to film preservation, specifically focusing on the restoration and preservation of the films of her late husband, legendary director Michael Powell. In addition to her appearance at Scarecrow, Ms. Schoonmaker will also be at Seattle Art Museum to present two of these films:

Thursday, March 20A Matter of Life and Death (1946)  35mm, 104 min.

Friday March 21Gone to Earth (1950)  35mm, 110 min.

 Tickets can also be purchased online here.

Both films start at 7:30pm at the Plestcheeff Auditorium in SAM Downtown. Ms. Schoonmaker will introduce the movies and answer audience questions each night.

 Tickets for both films are available at the SAM Box Office and at Scarecrow Video:

 $14—members of Seattle Art Museum, SIFF, Northwest Film Forum & TheFilmSchool.

$18—nonmembers 

 If there are seats remaining, single admission tickets will be sold at the door on the day of show.